Articles

The word "networking" has been corrupted. Let’s stop thinking about volume and immediate results in networking, and start considering how we can build genuine relationships that are beneficial for everyone involved. Person-to-person connection.

Job hunting is hard, especially if you haven't done it in years. In fact, in most of us, it inspires an impending sense of dread and doom.

Too often we receive emails that leave us scratching our heads, wondering what the writer was thinking when they hit "Send."

Yeah, we know the feeling. You’re ready to update your resume and start job hunting, but when you finally sit down, you find yourself staring at the flashing cursor on the screen, overwhelmed by how much you need to do.

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I regularly talk with established professional women who tell me that they are starting their first job search. They share that they’ve never looked before because jobs have come to them via a friend or former colleague. “I’ve been really lucky and have never had to look for a job,” they say. I disagree wholeheartedly with that statement. 

You’re a rock star. You get things done. You are always there to help a friend or colleague. Drive is your middle name. No one would ever dare to call you unmotivated! Now you’re motivated to change jobs. Let’s do this, sister.

Are you as discerning in your job search as you are in your dating life? When job hunting, many of us commit quickly, brush aside bad behavior and avoid warning signs in ways we’d never do when dating.

If you’re on the hunt for a new role, chances are you’re having lots of meetings to spread the word. While you’re meeting a variety of people, it’s important to consider your messaging and how to get the most out of each conversation. It starts with considering each person’s motivations and how to progress your search effectively through your connections.  

My perspective on planning for an international move and settling in to a new country. I share the lessons learned both personally and professionally over 6 months.

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It's time! You're going to make a career change. You know the job you want. Now what? There are many paths to finding the right job, and these four actions will help ensure you position yourself to get noticed in your new industry.

It’s time for a new job and you’re on the hunt. There are a million reasons for people to search and we all know that it is a huge no-no to say negative things about your current boss or company. So how do you share why you’re looking for your next gig (aka running screaming) without letting your negative feelings show and damaging your chances of landing your next gig?

It's time! You're going to make a career change. You know the job you want. Now what? There are many paths to finding the right job, and these four actions will help ensure you position yourself to get noticed in your new industry.

Your middle name is Reliable. You come in early, stay late and never stop until the job is done—and done well. Unfortunately, these things won’t help you progress in your career one bit if no one notices. So how do you get people to notice the work you’re doing? If the idea of self-promotion gives you the heebie jeebies, consider these ways to make it easier and let your light shine bright!

Providing feedback gets easier with time and practice. The anticipation and lead up to the conversation is typically worse than the actual meeting, so don’t be afraid to jump in and share feedback that will help your friend or colleague improve. Effective feedback is detailed, timely and intended to help the recipient perform in the best way possible.

If you have your eye on a promotion, chances are you’re thinking about the big moves that can get you there. You’re planning how you can save your company money, showcase your big wins and impress the right people. The big things are important, and so are the day-to-day habits that get you noticed in the right way. Consider moves you can make on a regular basis to set yourself up for the next step in your career.

How do you get a hiring manager’s attention when some job postings receive hundreds of applications? It can feel like an impossible task. Remember, cover letters and resumes are not the only way to put yourself in front of someone who could be your next employer. But for the purpose of this article, let’s say you are following the traditional path that many candidates take in their job search — seeing a job listing online and deciding to apply. What next?